Tsumkwe Profile

Tsumkwe Councilor: Fransina Gauz

Introduction:

This is a constituency profile, compiled with the aim to serve as a marketing tool. In view of development there is a need for marketing the constituency, in order to accelerate progress.

Background:

The constituency came into being after it was demarcated by the first Delimitation Commission which was established after independence by the Namibian government under the leadership of founding president His Excellency Dr. Sam Nujoma.

Tsumkwe constituency is in the eastern part of Otjozondjupa Region. The constituency is having two declared settlements, Tsumkwe the administrative centre of the constituency and Gam, which is a fast growing settlement in business terms.

Location:

Tsumkwe constituency is in the north-east of Namibia. It is bordering the following areas, in the north; Kavango East and Kavango West, in the east; Botswana, in the south; Omaheke region and in the south-west; Okakarara constituency and in the west; Grootfontein constituency.

The western part of Tsumkwe constituency is communal and covers some commercial farms. The eastern part is totally communal. 

Part of the constituency is behind the redline (cordon fence). Some of the commercial farms, although not behind the cordon fence, are under quarantine as well as part of the communal area, specifically Gam; it is behind the yellow line. Those under quarantine and behind yellow line can sell their domesticated animals (cattle) after spending 21 days in a quarantine camp.

Inhabitants:

As per the Population & Housing Census of 2011 the population of Tsumkwe stands at 9907. The constituency is largely inhabited by the Ju’/hoansi, !Kung and Ovaherero. Other tribes like Damara, Ovambo and Kavango are also living in the constituency.

The Ju’/hoansi and !Kung are recognised as a marginalised people in Namibia.

Education:

There are;

  • 6 Lower Primary Schools under Government of the Republic of Namibia (GRN) – (2 with hostels)
  • 6 Lower Primary Schools under Namibia Norway Association (NAMAS) - (4 with hostels)
  • 3 Primary Schools under GRN – (All with hostels)
  • 1 combined school under GRN – (hostel construction in progress)
  • 1 secondary school under GRN – (with hostel)

There are 22 Literacy classes in the whole constituency.


TUCSEN is on its way to open its doors in the constituency. A Vocational Centre is also envisaged. Namibia College of Open Learning (NamCol) is currently only operating on a distance mode.

Challenges in Education:
  • Struggling with unqualified teachers.
  • Out of all these 17 learning facilities only 9 are having formal hostels. There is a need to put up more hostels, if we regard education a key to development. Some parents in villages nearby the school facilities are not able to take their children to schools, due to lack of accommodation.
  • Those that are having relatives at villages with schooling facilities do register their children at those schools and children end up dropping out due to family feuds.
NB:

Due to so many out of school youth, there is a need to concentration on NamCol Programmes.

Employment:

Wages and salaries are the main source of income and only 31.7% of the inhabitants are earning wages and salaries, which means unemployment stands at 68.3%. Therefore we need to concentrate on the creation of employment and self-employment opportunities.

Agriculture

Animal Husbandry

Around 30% of the constituency’s inhabitants are farming with domestic animals.

Crop Husbandry 

More than 70% of the inhabitants are farming with crop. However crop production is being done at a very low scale. That’s why government is assisting 80 % of Tsumkwe residents with San Feeding Programme, if no 100% of the residents with Drought Relief Food.

Conservancies:

There are 3 conservancies

  • Nyae Nyae Conservancy in Tsumkwe East,
  • N#a/jagna Conservancy in Tsumkwe West
  • Ondjou Conservancy in Gam.

The conservancies are deriving their income from trophy hunting, harvesting of devil’s claws, tourisms activities and selling of crafts produced by members of the communities. That’s why it is believed that conservancies are playing a major role in the livelihoods of the inhabitants.

Tourism:

Tourism is also playing a major role in the livelihoods of the people of the constituency. Tourists visit the area regularly passing to and from Botswana and Khaudom Park in Kavango East. There are 1 Ju/’hoansi Living Museum in Grashoek just 6 km north of Rooidag Gate and 1 Living Hunters Museum at /Ao/oba 27 km north of Tsumkwe on the road to Khaudom National Park. At some villages some residents formed groups that perform traditional dances to entertain tourists, such as at Grashoek, Mountain Post, /Ao/oba. 

Water and Wetlands:

Water:

The availability of water is up to standard. Clean drinking water is available to 90.4% of the inhabitants.

There are also underground source where water is coming out of the ground believed to be fountains by unconfirmed reports. It is at Grashoek and !Aocha. The latter is the village where Chief Tsamkxao Coma of the Ju/’hoansi Traditional Authority is residing.

Wetlands:

There are seasonal wetlands in the area of Nyae Nyae pans and in the surrounding of the following villages !Aocha, Mountain post and Dou post. All these villages are around Nyae Nyae pans

Roads:

Roads in the constituency are not proper and needs an overhaul, however it seems tourists are appreciating the roads situation so much.

Housing:

62% of the people in the constituency are living in traditional houses and only 21.3% are living in modern houses. 6.9% lives in improvised houses.

Electricity:

It is a well-known fact that electricity is not readily available to the people of the constituency. However 1.3% of the inhabitants use electricity for cooking, while 7.9% of the inhabitants use electricity for lighting. Tsumkwe and Gam settlements are having solar power plants. Mangetti Dune is using an unreliable generator. While at Omatako the school and clinic are connected to NamPower grid.

Transportation and Travelling:

Travelling to health, schools and other service facilities in the constituency specifically from the villages that are not in the main road is a real challenge to the residents of those villages. There are no public transports at all. People are largely relying on GRN vehicle for travelling.

Health Facilities:

There are 4 health facilities; 1 health centre at Mangetti Dune, 1 declared health centre at Tsumkwe but operating as a clinic and 2 clinics at Gam and Omatako.

 

NB:

The desire is to turn the declared health centre at Tsumkwe into a District hospital and Gam’s clinic into a health centre. There is a general lack of ambulances in the constituency, accompanied by a widespread lack of transportation facilities coupled with the vastness of the constituency. Therefore, the upgrading of the abovementioned facilities will help a great deal.

Minerals:

It is reliably believed that B2Gold has been busy trying to explore minerals in Tsumkwe west in the area of Kukurushe. While another company, Votorantim Metals Namibia (Pty) Ltd is believed to have done a comprehensive exploration work on Exclusive Prospecting Licences areas of the following numbers: 5423, 5404 and5458 in Tsumkwe east.

Border Post:

There is a border post that serves as an entrance point from and to Botswana.

Accommodation Facilities for Visitors/Tourists:

1. Tsumkwe West
  • Camping sites; 1 at Grashoek, 1 at Ruskamp,
  • Guesthouse; 2 in Mangetti Dune.
2. Tsumkwe East
  • camping sites; 1 at Nhoma,
  • Community camps; 1 at Djokhoe and 1 at Makuri,
  • Guesthouses; (CLDC guesthouse, Regional Council guesthouse and Ministry of Gender’s guesthouse) and
  • Lodge; Tsumkwe Country Lodge
3. Gam
  • 1 lodge, Uazuva Lodge
  • Plantation, Animals and Birds:
Trees:

The following trees are found in most parts of Tsumkwe; Acacia, timber wood and Kamaku (Devil’s Claws).

Veldfood:

Mangetti nuts and other nuts, wild oranges in some areas called monkey oranges, wild potatoes, omahue , omongorua, veldcoffee, makwevo, nombumbu, ozondenja, kanjanju, veldbessies appears in most parts of Tsumkwe constituency.

Animals:

The following are animals found all over the constituency;

Oryx, Wildebeest, Skunks, Kudus, Warthogs, Giraffes, Elephants, Steenbok, Duikers, Buffalos, Elands, Roan, spotted Hyena, Leopards, Springbok, red billed Francolin and Sand grouse

Birds:

The following birds are found all over the constituency Doves, Turtle Doves, Quill and Guinea Fowls.

Snakes:

Black Mambas, Green mambas and many other snakes. However Tsumkwe area is known for its variety of snakes.

Religion:

The people of the constituency appear to be God fearing and very much faith based and the majority are believed to be Christians like the rest of the whole country.

Water and Wetlands:

Water:

The availability of water is up to standard. Clean drinking water is available to 90.4% of the inhabitants.

There are also underground source where water is coming out of the ground believed to be fountains by unconfirmed reports. It is at Grashoek and !Aocha. The latter is the village where Chief Tsamkxao Coma of the Ju/’hoansi Traditional Authority is residing.

Wetlands:

There are seasonal wetlands in the area of Nyae Nyae pans and in the surrounding of the following villages !Aocha, Mountain post and Dou post. All these villages are around Nyae Nyae pans

Roads:

Roads in the constituency are not proper and needs an overhaul, however it seems tourists are appreciating the roads situation so much.

Housing:

62% of the people in the constituency are living in traditional houses and only 21.3% are living in modern houses. 6.9% lives in improvised houses.

Electricity:

It is a well-known fact that electricity is not readily available to the people of the constituency. However 1.3% of the inhabitants use electricity for cooking, while 7.9% of the inhabitants use electricity for lighting. Tsumkwe and Gam settlements are having solar power plants. Mangetti Dune is using an unreliable generator. While at Omatako the school and clinic are connected to NamPower grid.

Transportation and Travelling:

Travelling to health, schools and other service facilities in the constituency specifically from the villages that are not in the main road is a real challenge to the residents of those villages. There are no public transports at all. People are largely relying on GRN vehicle for travelling.

Health Facilities:

There are 4 health facilities; 1 health centre at Mangetti Dune, 1 declared health centre at Tsumkwe but operating as a clinic and 2 clinics at Gam and Omatako.

NB:

The desire is to turn the declared health centre at Tsumkwe into a District hospital and Gam’s clinic into a health centre. There is a general lack of ambulances in the constituency, accompanied by a widespread lack of transportation facilities coupled with the vastness of the constituency. Therefore, the upgrading of the abovementioned facilities will help a great deal.

Minerals:

It is reliably believed that B2Gold has been busy trying to explore minerals in Tsumkwe west in the area of Kukurushe. While another company, Votorantim Metals Namibia (Pty) Ltd is believed to have done a comprehensive exploration work on Exclusive Prospecting Licences areas of the following numbers: 5423, 5404 and5458 in Tsumkwe east.

Border Post:

There is a border post that serves as an entrance point from and to Botswana.

Accommodation Facilities for Visitors/Tourists:

1. Tsumkwe West
  • Camping sites; 1 at Grashoek, 1 at Ruskamp,
  • Guesthouse; 2 in Mangetti Dune.
2. Tsumkwe East
  • camping sites; 1 at Nhoma,
  • Community camps; 1 at Djokhoe and 1 at Makuri,
  • Guesthouses; (CLDC guesthouse, Regional Council guesthouse and Ministry of Gender’s guesthouse) and
  • Lodge; Tsumkwe Country Lodge
3. Gam
  • 1 lodge, Uazuva Lodge
  • Plantation, Animals and Birds:
Trees:

The following trees are found in most parts of Tsumkwe; Acacia, timber wood and Kamaku (Devil’s Claws).

Veldfood:

Mangetti nuts and other nuts, wild oranges in some areas called monkey oranges, wild potatoes, omahue , omongorua, veldcoffee, makwevo, nombumbu, ozondenja, kanjanju, veldbessies appears in most parts of Tsumkwe constituency.

Animals:

The following are animals found all over the constituency

Oryx, Wildebeest, Skunks, Kudus, Warthogs, Giraffes, Elephants, Steenbok, Duikers, Buffalos, Elands, Roan, spotted Hyena, Leopards, Springbok, red billed Francolin and Sand grouse

Birds: 

The following birds are found all over the constituency Doves, Turtle Doves, Quill and Guinea Fowls.

Snakes:

Black Mambas, Green mambas and many other snakes. However Tsumkwe area is known for its variety of snakes.

Religion:

The people of the constituency appear to be God fearing and very much faith based and the majority are believed to be Christians like the rest

Contact Details

Tsumkwe Constituency Office, Tsumkwe

Private Bag 2070, Grooftontein

067 – 244035